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Karen Novikov
Karen Novikov

The Largest Astronomical Image Ever: 46-Gigapixel Milky Way with 50,000 New Objects


How to Download the 46-Gigapixel Image of the Milky Way




Have you ever wondered what our galaxy looks like in its full glory? Do you want to see a stunning image that captures every star, nebula, and planet in our cosmic neighborhood? If so, you will be amazed by the 46-gigapixel image of the Milky Way, which is the largest astronomical image ever created. In this article, we will show you how to download this incredible image and explore its wonders.


Introduction




The 46-gigapixel image of the Milky Way is a masterpiece of science and art. It is a mosaic of 268 sections of photos taken by astronomers from Ruhr University Bochum in Germany over a period of five years. The image covers a large section of the southern sky and contains 46 billion pixels, which means it has a resolution of 855,000 x 54,000 pixels. The file size of the image is 194 GB, which is equivalent to about 40,000 songs or 60 movies.




46-gigapixel milky way download



The image is not only beautiful but also informative. It reveals more than 50,000 new objects with variable brightness, which are stars or systems that change their brightness over time. These objects can help us learn more about our galaxy and its structure, evolution, and history. The image also shows many other fascinating features, such as star clusters, nebulae, supernova remnants, asteroids, comets, and even galaxies beyond our own.


The image is a treasure trove for anyone who loves astronomy or simply appreciates the beauty of nature. It allows us to see our galaxy in unprecedented detail and clarity. It also inspires us to wonder about our place in the universe and our connection to other worlds.


How to Access the Online Viewer




One way to enjoy the 46-gigapixel image of the Milky Way is to use the online viewer provided by Ruhr University Bochum. The online viewer is a web-based tool that lets you browse, zoom, and search for objects in the image. You can access it by visiting this URL: http://gds.astro.rub.de/


The online viewer has a simple interface that consists of a main window that displays the image and a toolbar that contains various controls. You can use your mouse or keyboard to navigate, zoom, and search for objects in the image. Here are some tips on how to use the online viewer:


  • To move around the image, you can drag it with your mouse or use the arrow keys on your keyboard.



  • To zoom in or out, you can use your mouse wheel or use the plus (+) or minus (-) keys on your keyboard.



  • To search for an object by its name, coordinates, or catalogue number, you can type it in the text box at the lower left corner of the screen and press Enter.



  • To adjust the color, quality, or filters of the image, you can use the buttons at the lower right corner of the screen.



  • To see more information about an object, you can click on it and a pop-up window will appear with its name, coordinates, magnitude, and other data.



  • To see a list of all the objects with variable brightness, you can click on the button at the upper right corner of the screen.



The online viewer is a great way to explore the 46-gigapixel image of the Milky Way without downloading it. However, it has some limitations, such as slow loading time, limited zoom level, and low quality. If you want to see the image in its full glory, you will need to download the image file and view it with a suitable software.


How to Download the Image File




Downloading the 46-gigapixel image of the Milky Way is not an easy task. It requires a lot of time, bandwidth, and storage space. The image file is 194 GB in size, which means it will take several hours or even days to download depending on your internet speed and connection. You will also need a hard drive or an external device that can store at least 200 GB of data.


There are several options and sources for downloading the image file. You can choose the one that suits your preferences and needs. Here are some of them:


  • You can download the image file directly from Ruhr University Bochum's website by visiting this URL: http://gds.astro.rub.de/download/. You will see a list of 268 sections of photos that make up the image. You can download each section individually or all of them together as a ZIP file. However, this method is not recommended because it is very slow and unreliable. You may encounter errors, interruptions, or corrupted files during the download process.



  • You can download the image file using a torrent client, such as BitTorrent or uTorrent. This method is faster and more reliable than direct download because it uses peer-to-peer technology that distributes the file among multiple users. You can find the torrent file for the image by visiting this URL: http://gds.astro.rub.de/download/torrent/. You will need to install a torrent client on your computer and open the torrent file with it. The torrent client will then start downloading the image file from other users who have it.



  • You can download the image file using a download manager, such as Internet Download Manager or Free Download Manager. This method is also faster and more reliable than direct download because it uses multiple connections and segments to speed up the download process. You can find the download link for the image by visiting this URL: http://gds.astro.rub.de/download/zip/. You will need to install a download manager on your computer and copy and paste the download link into it. The download manager will then start downloading the image file from Ruhr University Bochum's website.



Whichever option or source you choose, you should be patient and careful when downloading the 46-gigapixel image of the Milky Way. It may take a long time to complete and consume a lot of your internet data. You should also check the integrity and quality of the downloaded file before opening it.


How to download 46-gigapixel image of the Milky Way


46-gigapixel Milky Way photo online viewer


Largest astronomical image ever created: 46-gigapixel Milky Way


46-gigapixel Milky Way mosaic by Ruhr University Bochum


46-gigapixel photo of the Milky Way galaxy: facts and details


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46-gigapixel Milky Way picture: zoom and explore


46-gigapixel image of the Milky Way: how it was made


46-gigapixel Milky Way photo: what it reveals about our galaxy


46-gigapixel Milky Way image: best filters and settings


46-gigapixel photo of the Milky Way: comparison with other images


46-gigapixel Milky Way mosaic: how to print and display


46-gigapixel image of the Milky Way: challenges and limitations


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46-gigapixel image of the Milky Way: scientific significance and impact


46-gigapixel photo of the Milky Way: tips and tricks


46-gigapixel Milky Way image: frequently asked questions


46-gigapixel photo of the Milky Way: reviews and feedback


46-gigapixel image of the Milky Way: future plans and updates


46-gigapixel Milky Way photo: fun facts and trivia


Why you should download 46-gigapixel image of the Milky Way


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The art behind 46-gigapixel photo of the Milky Way How to View and Explore the Image File




Once you have downloaded the 46-gigapixel image of the Milky Way, you will need a special software or tool that can open and display such a large and high-resolution file. You cannot use a regular image viewer or editor, such as Windows Photo Viewer or Photoshop, because they will not be able to handle the file size and format. You will also need a powerful computer with enough memory and processing speed to run the software or tool smoothly.


There are several software and tools that can open and display the 46-gigapixel image of the Milky Way. You can choose the one that suits your preferences and needs. Here are some of them:


  • You can use FITS Liberator, which is a free software developed by NASA, ESA, and ESO for opening and editing FITS files, which are a common format for astronomical images. You can download FITS Liberator from this URL: https://www.spacetelescope.org/projects/fits_liberator/. You will need to unzip the downloaded file and run the setup.exe file to install the software on your computer. You can then open the 46-gigapixel image of the Milky Way with FITS Liberator and use its features to zoom, pan, rotate, adjust, and save the image.



  • You can use GigaPan Viewer, which is a free software developed by Carnegie Mellon University for viewing and exploring gigapixel images. You can download GigaPan Viewer from this URL: http://www.gigapan.com/cms/support/software. You will need to register an account and log in to download the software. You can then install the software on your computer and open the 46-gigapixel image of the Milky Way with GigaPan Viewer. You can use its features to zoom, pan, rotate, annotate, and share the image.



Whichever software or tool you choose, you will be able to view and explore the 46-gigapixel image of the Milky Way in its full glory. You will be able to see every star, nebula, and planet in our galaxy with amazing detail and clarity. You will also be able to identify and learn more about the objects in the image by using online databases or catalogues, such as SIMBAD or NED.


Conclusion




The 46-gigapixel image of the Milky Way is a remarkable achievement of science and technology. It is a stunning image that captures the beauty and diversity of our galaxy. It is also a valuable resource that reveals new information and insights about our cosmic environment.


Downloading the 46-gigapixel image of the Milky Way is not an easy task, but it is worth it if you want to see our galaxy like never before. You can use various options and sources to download the image file and use different software and tools to view and explore it. You can also use online resources to learn more about the objects in the image.


We hope this article has helped you understand how to download the 46-gigapixel image of the Milky Way and enjoy its wonders. If you have any questions or feedback, please feel free to leave a comment below. We would love to hear from you.


FAQs




  • Q: How long does it take to download the 46-gigapixel image of the Milky Way?



  • A: It depends on your internet speed and connection, but it may take several hours or even days to download the image file, which is 194 GB in size.



  • Q: What are some of the benefits of downloading the 46-gigapixel image of the Milky Way?



  • A: Some of the benefits are: you can see the image in its full resolution and quality; you can view it offline without internet access; you can use it for personal or educational purposes; you can discover new objects with variable brightness; you can enhance your knowledge and appreciation of astronomy.



  • Q: What are some of the challenges of downloading the 46-gigapixel image of the Milky Way?



  • A: Some of the challenges are: you need a lot of time, bandwidth, and storage space; you may encounter errors, interruptions, or corrupted files during the download process; you need a special software or tool to open and display the image file; you need a powerful computer to run the software or tool smoothly.



  • Q: How can I learn more about the objects in the 46-gigapixel image of the Milky Way?



  • A: You can use online databases or catalogues, such as SIMBAD or NED, to search for the name, coordinates, or catalogue number of the objects in the image. You can also use online resources, such as Wikipedia or NASA, to read more about the objects and their characteristics.



  • Q: What are some of the other gigapixel images of astronomical objects that I can download and view?



  • A: Some of the other gigapixel images of astronomical objects that you can download and view are: the 1.5-gigapixel image of the Andromeda Galaxy by NASA; the 4.3-gigapixel image of the Orion Nebula by ESO; the 9-gigapixel image of the Milky Way by ESO; the 24.6-gigapixel image of the Moon by China's Chang'e 3 mission.





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